Tag: Italian wine

Michele Chiarlo Palás Barolo 2010

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Our old Monday through Friday work schedule that I irritably referred to as “up at six, home at six”, deserved to be rewarded with Friday night dinner and drinks at one of our favorite local haunts. Thankfully, our routine is much easier now but the Friday mindset of rewarding ourselves for wrapping up another work week has remained constant. In keeping with the traditions of a Boozy Lifestyle, if we aren’t treating ourselves to a meal at a restaurant, we must at least splurge on a good bottle of wine.

We’re drinking the 2010 vintage of Michele Chiarlo Palás Barolo in 2017. The violet-rimmed ruby color pour that is characteristic of young Nebbiolo has changed to a translucent brick-orange over seven years of aging.

Barolo Palas Michele Chiarlo

Have you ever had a first impression of someone with your nose instead of your eyes? This wine attracts you with a delicious and intriguing scent. With all of its aromatic complexity, I’m having trouble identifying the many facets of its bouquet individually.  Oodles of dried fruits mingle with licorice candy and fresh spring roses. Not to take away from the enjoyment on the palate, but the nose on this Barolo is by far my favorite aspect.

The wine is light-bodied on the palate, tasting of dried apricot, prune and currants. The initial dried fruit flavors are followed by bright acidity with tangy cranberry flavors. On the finish, the brightness lingers along with soft tannins. This northern Italian varietal has some similarities to Pinot Noir in body and mouth-feel.

The winemaker, Michele Chiarlo, began producing wine in 1956 in Piedmont, Italy. Today, he runs the business with his two sons, Stefano and Alberto. “Palás” is a Piedmontese word meaning palace of luxury. After browsing the Michele Chiarlo website, I get the impression that Palás is a fancy label given to one of the wineries more budget-friendly collections. But no matter how you slice it, Barolo is still one of the most prestigious wines of Italy.

An easy way to remember some of Italy’s great wines are the three big B’s: Barolo, Barbaresco, and Brunello di Montalcino. Barolo and Barbaresco, produced in the Piedmont region in northwest Italy, are made from the Nebbiolo grape. A difficult grape to cultivate, Nebbiolo is most successful in Piedmont’s cool climate, low rainfall, and autumn fog. Brunello, the pride of Tuscany, is made from the Sangiovese grape. The Sangiovese variety that is grown around the village of Montalcino is called Brunello. This area, located south of the Chianti Classico zone, is drier and warmer than Chianti. In this terroir, the Brunello variety of Sangiovese produces deep-color, full-bodied wines with balanced tannins. Whether you prefer the delicate quality of Nebbiolo-based Barolo and Barbaresco or the robust character of Brunello, you can’t go wrong with any of Italy’s three big B’s.