Acorn Squash and Crossfork Creek Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

Acorn Squash and Crossfork Creek Cabernet Sauvignon 2015

Acorn squash usually conjures images of fall’s bounty, the autumn harvest’s cornucopia of pumpkin, butternut, spaghetti squash, and all those hard, bumpy winter squashes that we don’t quite know what to do with. The hard rind makes these squashes long-lasting, hence the term “winter squash” although here in the Northeast, they are usually grown throughout the summer and picked in late September and October.

So how did we acquire a garden-fresh home-grown acorn squash in July? My sister-in-law, who moved to New Orleans last year, had the realization that a southern garden can be planted as early as March, resulting in mature winter squash in the middle of summer. On her most recent visit to the New York area, she managed to pack two large home-grown squashes in her suitcase. She must have had to leave behind half her clothes and shoes so as not to exceed the 50-pound weight limit.

My sister-in-law gave us a terrific tip to speed up the cooking time for hard squash that I haven’t seen on the internet. After cutting them in half and scooping out the seeds, she microwaves the halves for about 5 minutes. Although she likes hers with cinnamon, we opted for the more prevalent butter and brown sugar preparation, followed by baking.

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Cut in half. I did it lengthwise, but either direction will work. Scoop out the seeds and that pithy stuff. My trusty grapefruit spoon comes to the rescue. Microwave the halves for five or six minutes.

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Smear a half tablespoon of soft butter around the hollow. Sprinkle a tablespoon of brown sugar on each half. Bake at 350 degrees until a fork goes through the flesh easily (about 20 minutes)

The acorn squash was an enjoyable accompaniment to baby-back ribs with Brooks sauce. 

The wine of the evening is something new we’re trying, the 2015 Crossfork Creek Cabernet Sauvignon from Sheridan Vineyards in Yakima Valley, Washington. The Yakima Valley AVA, established in 1983, was the first AVA established in Washington State. It’s part of the larger Columbia Valley that garnered AVA status the following year, in 1984. Widely planted varietals include Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Riesling, Pinot Gris, and Syrah. The region is also known for growing Cascade hops, which are very highly regarded and sought after according to my beer-brewing friend.

The nose is fruity towards jammy, with floral notes and hints of green bell pepper and herbs. On the palate plum, cherry, and currants abound with afterthoughts of licorice and tobacco. Many of the Washington State Cabernet Sauvignon wines we’ve tried have been lighter in body than their California counterparts. Not so with Crossfork Creek; it’s squarely down the middle as a medium bodied Cab. The medium-length finish has some bright acidity balanced with oak and light tannins. Overall, Crossfork Creek is well worth the under $20 price.

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